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Puget Sound Seabird Survey and Motus Wildlife Tracking

Puget Sound is the nation’s second largest marine estuary, and covers just over 1,000 square miles. It supports significant wildlife including marine mammals, marine birds and important salmon populations. The Puget Sound Seabird Survey is a community science effort created by Seattle Audubon in 2007 and is currently being transitioned to Puget Sound Bird Observatory (PSBO). The program uses over… Read Project SummaryPuget Sound Seabird Survey and Motus Wildlife Tracking

Assessing impacts of wetland restoration and hydrological management on amphibians

This project builds on a 2017 CREOi amphibian research project, and will focus on baseline monitoring for amphibian presence, diversity and abundance as well as habitat characteristics (hydrology, water quality, and vegetation) in a series of seasonal and permanent ponds and wetlands in the study area. This study area is 480 acres of seasonally wet agricultural land and associated wetlands… Read Project SummaryAssessing impacts of wetland restoration and hydrological management on amphibians

Olympic Mudminnow Information System: Supporting public awareness and conservation of Washington State’s only endemic species

Cryptic and difficult to find, but once discovered the Olympic mudminnow is both colorful and full of charisma. This project is a continuation of 2017 and 2018 projects focused on improving scientific understanding of the Olympic mudminnow, and building a community of practice to enhance their conservation. Previous accomplishments include a synthesis of existing mudminnow population data and development of… Read Project SummaryOlympic Mudminnow Information System: Supporting public awareness and conservation of Washington State’s only endemic species

Recovery of a tidal salt marsh on the Kitsap Peninsula

Since 2005, Stillwaters Environmental Center near Kingston, WA has been documenting ecological conditions in the 30+ acre Carpenter Creek estuary and salt marsh. With the recent replacement of a second undersized culvert with a bridge, natural tidal flow has been reestablished in the marsh. Our monitoring and research program addresses the complexities of a marsh ecosystem and its recovery. Our… Read Project SummaryRecovery of a tidal salt marsh on the Kitsap Peninsula

Living with Wildlife

The goal of this project is to create a robust Living with Wildlife program combining outreach, community empowerment, and hands-on science to address Vashon-Maury Island’s unique challenges. We wish to empower residents to handle the presence of wildlife (in particular, large carnivores) and keep our rich marine resources safe from overharvest. Vashon-Maury Island is a perfect storm for many Living… Read Project SummaryLiving with Wildlife

Conserving native butterfly species in a Washington agroecosystem

  • Samantha Bussan and Cheryl Schultz, Washington State University Vancouver

  • 2018

Worldwide, many butterfly species are at risk due to the loss of native grasslands. In North America, agricultural intensification, fire suppression, urbanization, and biological invasions threaten grassland butterfly habitat. Since much of the area that was formerly grassland has been converted to agriculture, it is critical to understand how to support native butterflies in an agroecosystem while still supporting the… Read Project SummaryConserving native butterfly species in a Washington agroecosystem

Understanding algal blooms in Liberty Bay, WA

Liberty Bay experiences intense and episodic algal blooms, which is of concern to local residents who perceive that the blooms are ‘getting worse.’ Without a continuous record of monitoring estuarine conditions and algal bloom events, evaluating change over time is difficult. In 2017, we established a community volunteer program to conduct year-round monitoring to document: 1) frequency, timing, and magnitude of phytoplankton blooms, 2)… Read Project SummaryUnderstanding algal blooms in Liberty Bay, WA

Investigating the impacts of a native mammal predator on key native and invasive species in marine and estuarine ecosystems of Northwest Washington

The goal of this project was to document the diet of an aquatic mammal predator, the river otter (Lontra canadensis), in coastal estuaries of the Makah Reservation in Northwest Washington. We sought to understand the potential role of these predators in bio-mitigation of a recent infestation of the invasive European green crab (Carcinus maenas) in Makah estuaries, as well as… Read Project SummaryInvestigating the impacts of a native mammal predator on key native and invasive species in marine and estuarine ecosystems of Northwest Washington

Protecting whales on the US West Coast by assessing and reducing “cryptic mortality”

Many US laws and policies use “best available science” to determine when a whale or dolphin population requires protection from ship strikes or entanglement in fishing gear. These protection measures may only be triggered when the science shows that we are exceeding some allowable harm threshold, but carcasses detected on the beach reflect only the tip of the iceberg. Many… Read Project SummaryProtecting whales on the US West Coast by assessing and reducing “cryptic mortality”

Information system and stakeholder symposium to support the conservation of Olympic mudminnow

This is a continuation of a 2017 CREOi award to support assessment of mudminnow populations in Washington State. Olympic mudminnow (Novumbra hubbsi) are Washington State’s only endemic species, and yet are subject to challenges plaguing many noncommercial freshwater species; namely the lack of consistent research and monitoring leading to knowledge gaps that limit conservation actions. The specific objectives of this proposal… Read Project SummaryInformation system and stakeholder symposium to support the conservation of Olympic mudminnow