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Learning from fish that sing in the kelp forest

In 2022, Washington State gave highest priority to the protection and restoration of kelp forests in the Salish Sea. At the same time, state agencies acknowledged that apart from mapping the geographic extent of the kelp canopy, they lacked affordable methods for monitoring the ecological functioning of kelp forests. This project explored the use of “soundscapes,” i.e., monitoring of fishes… Read Project SummaryLearning from fish that sing in the kelp forest

Restoring wápupxn (Canada lynx) to their native lands in Northeast Washington: a translocation project

This a continuation of a 2021 CREOi-funded project. In 1993, wápupxn (Canada lynx, Lynx canadensis) were listed as a Washington State threatened species and by 2017 were up-listed to endangered status. In 2000, they were listed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service as threatened under the Endangered Species Act. Numerous studies have pointed to evidence that the persistence of… Read Project SummaryRestoring wápupxn (Canada lynx) to their native lands in Northeast Washington: a translocation project

Assessing anthropogenic effects on fungal decomposer communities along land use gradients of the Deschutes River system

  • Daniel Gilberts, The Evergreen State College 

  • 2022

Fungi initiate the breakdown of organic carbon in rivers and streams, but little work has been done to understand their responses to anthropogenic effects in freshwater environments. This study focuses on how fungal decomposers of leaf litter, specifically hyphomycetes, in the Deschutes River system in western Washington respond to differences in chemical inputs and proximity to human influence. Past work… Read Project SummaryAssessing anthropogenic effects on fungal decomposer communities along land use gradients of the Deschutes River system

Motus Wildlife Tracking

The Motus Wildlife Tracking System is an international collaborative network of researchers that uses automated radio telemetry to simultaneously track hundreds of individual birds, bats and insects. The system enables a community of researchers, educators, organizations and citizens to undertake impactful research and education on the ecology and conservation of migratory animals. Motus is based on two components — tiny… Read Project SummaryMotus Wildlife Tracking

Understanding wildlife activity and the impacts of recreation on wildlife in Washington State Parks

This is a continuation of a 2021 CREOi-funded project. Washington State Parks are increasingly becoming islands within a developed landscape. These islands have become important areas supporting human physical and mental well-being. However, there is concern that higher rates of use of state parks are putting greater pressure and stress on wildlife species for which the parks may provide some… Read Project SummaryUnderstanding wildlife activity and the impacts of recreation on wildlife in Washington State Parks

Restoring wápupxn (Canada lynx) to their native lands in Northeast Washington: a translocation project

In 1993, wápupxn (Canada lynx, Lynx canadensis) were listed as a Washington State threatened species and by 2017 were up-listed to endangered status. In 2000, they were listed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service as threatened under the Endangered Species Act. Numerous studies have pointed to evidence that the persistence of lynx in Washington State will depend on maintaining… Read Project SummaryRestoring wápupxn (Canada lynx) to their native lands in Northeast Washington: a translocation project

Understanding wildlife activity and the impacts of recreation on wildlife in Washington State Parks

Washington state parks are increasingly becoming islands within a developed landscape. These islands have become important areas supporting human physical and mental well-being. However, there is concern that higher rates of use of state parks are putting greater pressure and stress on wildlife species for which the parks may provide some of the last remaining habitat. To effectively manage and… Read Project SummaryUnderstanding wildlife activity and the impacts of recreation on wildlife in Washington State Parks

Assessing large carnivore dietary interactions in Eastern Washington

The goal of this project was to gain information on the composition and breadth of cougar (Puma concolor) and wolf (Canis lupus) diets to increase our understanding of multi-carnivore dietary interactions in eastern Washington. The project is part of the Washington Predator-Prey Project (WPPP), a collaborative effort between the University of Washington, Seattle (UW) and the Washington Department of Fish and… Read Project SummaryAssessing large carnivore dietary interactions in Eastern Washington

Investigating interactions between Dungeness crabs and invasive European green crab in two estuaries on the Makah Reservation

The goal of this project was to evaluate the threat of invasive European green crab (Carcinus maenas; hereafter green crab) on subadult Dungeness crab (Metacarcinus magister) in two riverine estuaries on the Makah Reservation. We had two primary study questions: 1) What is the population and distribution of Dungeness crabs and green crabs in the lower Wa’atch and Tsoo-Yess rivers… Read Project SummaryInvestigating interactions between Dungeness crabs and invasive European green crab in two estuaries on the Makah Reservation

Connecting and expanding amphibian monitoring in Western Washington

Various non-profit, government, and academic entities study and monitor amphibian populations in the Pacific Northwest, however there are limited resources for data-sharing and coordination among these entities. Oxbow Farm & Conservation Center, in collaboration with Woodland Park Zoo, has been working to address these gaps. As a first step, Oxbow and Woodland Park Zoo staff distributed a questionnaire on monitoring… Read Project SummaryConnecting and expanding amphibian monitoring in Western Washington